Saturday, March 15, 2014
Puerto Rico leg 1

Puerto Rico leg 1

Saturday, January 4, 2014
Too real.

Too real.

Sunday, December 29, 2013
#Jellyfish (at New England Aquarium)

#Jellyfish (at New England Aquarium)

Wednesday, December 25, 2013
#merrychristmas (at Londonderry NH)

#merrychristmas (at Londonderry NH)

Sunday, December 22, 2013
So much of writing, for me, is about being open—open to new ideas, open to other frameworks, open to details I don’t understand at first.

Amy Tan on writing, adding to other famous writers’ wisdom on the craft.

Pair with the year’s best books on writing.

(via explore-blog)

"The wolf is giving birth."
"The devil is beating his wife."
Lol what.

"The wolf is giving birth."

"The devil is beating his wife."

Lol what.

Thursday, December 5, 2013
Life is going to present to you a series of transformations. And the point of education should be to transform you. To teach you how to be transformed so you can ride the waves as they come. But today, the point of education is not education. It’s accreditation. The more accreditation you have, the more money you make. That’s the instrumental logic of neoliberalism. And this instrumental logic comes wrapped in an envelope of fear. And my Ivy League, my MIT students are the same. All I feel coming off of my students is fear. That if you slip up in school, if you get one bad grade, if you make one fucking mistake, the great train of wealth will leave you behind. And that’s the logic of accreditation. If you’re at Yale, you’re in the smartest 1% in the world. […] And the brightest students in the world are learning in fear. I feel it rolling off of you in waves. But you can’t learn when you’re afraid. You cannot be transformed when you are afraid.

- Junot Díaz, speaking at Yale (via beaucadeau)

My Cupertino mentality is in full force today; I need this reminder.

(via sabistan)

(Source: avelvetmood)

Tuesday, November 19, 2013
Always be in a state of expectancy, and see that you leave room for God to come in as He likes. Oswald Chambers

The publishers claim that The Hobbit, though very unlike Alice [in Wonderland], resembles it in being the work of a professor at play. A more important truth is that both belong to a very small class of books which have nothing in common save that each admits us to a world of its own—a world that seems to have been going on long before we stumbled into it but which, once found by the right reader, becomes indispensable to him.

[…]

For it must be understood that this is a children’s book only in the sense that the first of many readings can be undertaken in the nursery. Alice is read gravely by children and with laughter by grown ups; The Hobbit, on the other hand, will be funnier to its youngest readers, and only years later, at a tenth or a twentieth reading, will they begin to realise what deft scholarship and profound reflection have gone to make everything in it so ripe, so friendly, and in its own way so true. Prediction is dangerous: but The Hobbit may well prove a classic.

C. S. Lewis reviews The Hobbit, 1937

Pair with Tolkien’s own little-known, gorgeous art for the first edition of The Hobbit

(via explore-blog)

Tuesday, October 29, 2013
What horrifies me most is the idea of being useless: well-educated, brilliantly promising, and fading out into an indifferent middle age. Sylvia Plath (via fawun)

(Source: hellanne)